Fine Motor Skills

Lapbooking And Special Needs

Special Needs

Way back when we had preschoolers before, we explored lapbooks and had loads of fun. Now that we have preschoolers again, I started exploring lapbooks again recently and decided to give it a try with all the kids. (More on those lapbooks in another post).

I had been wanting to explore things that would be more fun and incorporate the different learning styles of all the kids. I thought the big kids might be ready for notebooking, but there is still too much writing, so I opted to try the lapbooks again.

My kids absorb information from videos, books, and through discussion, but they have a hard time showing what they know. Enter lapbooking. I thought lapbooking would be a great way to include all of the kids at whatever level they are at.

I made it as easy as possible. I cut out the papers. I even wrote on the papers (I figured we could ease into them doing the writing, eventually). All they had to do was discuss and then glue. Wouldn’t you know it, my 11 year old (Elisha – with autism) doesn’t like gluing either? Well, he did it after a bit of prodding.

Note to self, we need:

  • a label maker (because of this post about dysgraphia)
  • more glue dots
  • glue sticks
  • loads of fun and colorful paper

I found this series on Lapbooking With Special Needs Kids that I found particularly inspiring. I encourage you to check it out.

You can Lapbook on a Shoestring as this post suggests by providing a ton of resources.

Lapbooking is:

  • versatile
  • adaptable
  • suitable for multi -age
  • useful for a variety of topics
  • perfect for special needs students
  • good for perfectionists
  • good for creativity
  • good for review
  • can be done in short bursts of time (and attention span)
  • an answer to prayer

Jimmie (from Jimmie’s Collage and Notebooking Fairy) had this great idea to prepare all the mini books ahead of time. She also has an amazing lapbooking Squidoo Lense that  is just loaded with resources and I highly suggest you check out if you are even the slightest bit interested in lapbooking.

Do you use lapbooks or notebooks in your homeschool? 

Do you use lapbooks or notebooks with your special needs kids?

Being Adaptable For Your Special Needs Student

Elisha struggles with printing. Each time he is faced with printing he freaks out and has a melt down. These meltdowns are significantly smaller and much less frequent than when we first started homeschooling 5 years ago.

We have tried a variety of methods for making things easier for him. Not all of these things works every time, so I have to think on the fly and pull things out of my hat at a minute’s notice.

Yesterday he was struggling with putting pen to paper to complete some simple multiplication problems. He hit a mental road block. What seems so simple to me is an impossible task to him.

He tried printing math questions out on the iPad but these questions were too big and don’t fit on the screen when he drew them with his finger.

I tried printing out special graph paper for him to use, but he wouldn’t have any of it.

What he really needed was to step away and clear his head with a cup of tea (it would have been coffee, but we were all out).

When he came back, he was ready to work. I hand printed all his questions out on the graph paper. One question per page. He worked all the questions out on the 1/2 inch graph paper, talking out each question as he went.

My helpful hint for today is to be ADAPTABLE.

I am linking up with Helpful Homeschool Hints. I don’t know if you noticed, but the Helpful Homeschool Hints has moved to the Homeschool Classroom. Take a few moments and visit to see what everyone else has to share.

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